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Antitrust vs. Anti-Trump: The Donald’s Feud With Amazon

Amazon is the largest internet-based retailer in the United States, and it is growing exponentially. Consumers have come to rely on the retailer — and what’s not to love about Amazon Prime — to the tune of more than $107 billion in net sales in 2015. It kicked off the summer by hitting an all-time high of more than $724 per share, leaving Facebook and other high valued companies in the dust. And though Amazon is showing no signs of slowing down (it’s looking to become a multi-trillion dollar company in the next 10 years), due to some of its...

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‘Tis the season to be knocked off…

Holiday shopping is getting into full swing as we are only days away from Black Friday, and perhaps more importantly, Cyber Monday.  This season, Digital Law Group wants to make sure consumers are buying YOUR products, and not counterfeits or knockoffs from third party sellers on e-commerce and auction websites. Sales platforms such as Amazon, eBay and Alibaba are great channels to sell products to the masses; however, unless monitored on a regular basis, these sites enable third-party sellers to capitalize on counterfeit, and in some cases, damaged or expired goods, leaving your profits and reputation on the chopping block. The Alibaba...

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Battle of the trolls

No, we are not talking about Middle-earth (sorry nerds). We are talking about an industry nuisance – the patent troll. Now, the image that may come to mind for you upon hearing the term “patent troll,” is one of a gnarly, greenish creature under a bridge sketching indecipherable images. The funny thing is, actual patent trolls are not that far off. A patent troll, or a non-practicing entity (NPE), is an individual or company that acquires overly broad patents for the sole purpose of extorting licensing fees from legitimate creators. Today, more than half of patent infringement claims are brought by...

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Act now…this offer is available for a limited time only!

Did we get your attention? Good. That was the point. The subject line of this newsletter, much like many of those limited time offer claims you see on tv, was used purely to elicit an immediate response. Just like this email will be available in your inbox any time you want to read it, those “limited time offers” are available any time a consumer calls or places an order online – not just in that 10 minute time period as many ads suggest. Soliciting a response from a consumer in this way may seem harmless enough, but this common practice...

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